Category Archives: Writing Tip of the Day

Write Your Novel Step by Step (2) – “Get Out of My Head!”

When beginning a new novel, writers are often faced with one of two initial problems that hinders them right from the get go.  One – sometimes you have a story concept but can’t think of what to do with it. … Continue reading

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Write Your Novel Step by Step (1) – Stages of Writing a Novel

Writers often begin the novel development process by thinking about what their story needs: a main character/protagonist/hero, a solid theme, a riveting plot and, of course, to meet all the touch points of their genre. Because this is just the … Continue reading

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How to Avoid the “Genre Trap”

A common misconception sees genre as a fixed list of dramatic requirements or a rigid structural template from which there can be no deviation. Writers laboring under these restrictions often find themselves boxed-in creatively. They become snared in the Genre … Continue reading

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Drop Exposition through Arguments

Here’s a short one… A person talking is often boring. People arguing are often compelling. If you have to drop exposition, try to do it in the back and forth barbs of an argument. Let the characters use the information … Continue reading

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Screenwriting Tip: Don’t say it if you can show it!

Excerpted from: 50 Sure-Fire Storytelling Tricks! By Melanie Anne Phillips Available in Paperback and for Kindle   Movies are a visual medium. The strongest impact is created by what is seen, not what is said. Although we might marvel at well-written … Continue reading

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Screenwriting Tip: Break Up Monologues…

Excerpted from: 50 Sure-Fire Storytelling Tricks! By Melanie Anne Phillips Available in Paperback and for Kindle   There are some moments in some movies in which a long monolog by a single individual works well. Any inspiring public speech, for example, … Continue reading

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There are Many Kinds of Endings

A character might change and resolve their personal angst, yet fail in their quest as a result. Was it worth it? Depends on the degree of angst and the size of the failure. Another character might not resolve their angst; … Continue reading

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Top Ten Tricks for Screenwriting

Trick 1 Screenwriting 101 Screenplays are blueprints for movies. As such, they are not art, but instructions for creating art. Therefore, there are two things every great screenplay must have: A good story, and a clear and understandable description of how … Continue reading

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Novels Aren’t Stories…

A novel can be extremely free form. Some are simply narratives about a fictional experience. Others are a collection of several stories that may or may not be intertwined. Jerzy N. Kosinski (the author of “Being There,” wrote another novel … Continue reading

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The Structure of “Collective Goals”

Some novice writers become so wrapped up in interesting events and bits of action that they forget to have a central unifying goal that gives purpose to all the other events that take place. This creates a plot without a … Continue reading

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