50 Sure-Fire Storytelling Tricks! (Trick 23)


50 Sure-Fire

Storytelling Tricks!


Click on the book to
read it online for free

 Also available in Paperback
and for your Kindle

Free Resources

 


Home Mail: customer-service@storymind.com

Writing Software



Contact Us - About Us - Lowest Price Guarantee - Shipping - Return Policy


Copyright Melanie Anne Phillips - Owner, Storymind.com, Creator Storyweaver, Co-creator Dramatica



Write Your Novel
or Screenplay
Step by Step!

$29.95

StoryWeaver Idea Spinner

Banish Writer’s

Block Forever!


$19.95

Predicts Your Story’s Perfect Structure!

$99.95


Dramatica

Interactive
Index Cards


$19.95


Throughline Articles on Writing Free Online Writing Classes in Streaming Video

Follow Us

Follow Us at Storymind.com Free Bonus Package The Writer's Survival Kit Bonus Package 12 Hour Story Structure Class Learn Story Structure

Our Free 113 Part Writing Course in
Streaming Video

Secrets

of Story

Structure

Our Free 3 Hour
Audio Program

Secrets of Story Structure Introduction to Structure

Free 2 Hour Video
Covers the Basics

Movie Magic Screenwriter - Formats while you write!

$149.95


Automatically formats while
you write!

Write Your Novel Step By Step Write Your Novel Step by Step (Home Page)

Our Free 200 Page
eBook is filled
with our Best Tips

Free Book - 50 Sure-Fire Storytelling Tricks! Master the Art of Storytelling

With Our Free
50 Sure-Fire
Storytelling Tricks!

Dramatica Writer's DreamKit

$49.95


Writer’s DreamKit

Trick 23

Get Into Your Characters’ Heads

One of the most powerful opportunities of the novel format is the ability to describe what a character is thinking. In movies or stage plays (with exceptions) you must show what the character is thinking through action and/or dialog. But in a novel, you can just come out and say it.

For example, in a movie, you might say:

John walks slowly to the window and looks out at the park bench where he last saw Sally. His eyes fill with tears. He bows his head and slowly closes the blinds.

But in a novel you might write:

John walked slowly to the window, letting his gaze drift toward the park bench where he last saw Sally. Why did I let her go, he thought. I wanted so much to ask her to stay. Saddened, he reflected on happier times with her – days of more contentment than he ever imagined he could feel.

The previous paragraph uses two forms of expressing a character’s thoughts. One, is the direct quote of the thought, as if it were dialog spoken internally to oneself. The other is a summary and paraphrase of what was going on in the character’s head.

Most novels are greatly enhanced by stepping away from a purely objective narrative perspective, and drawing the reader into the minds of the character’s themselves.

Go to Table of Contents